Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
St. Nicholas & Amsterdam Ave., N.Y.C., Nov. 1980

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 5" x 34" (id#102.1/360.28-39)
A panoramic view of upper Broadway in New York City, with the famous Audubon Ballroom, site of the assassination of Malcolm X.
Audubon Ballroom, 166th & Broadway, Nov. 1980

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 3 1/2" x 25" (id#105.3/360.16-20)

The Audubon Ballroom was for many years a landmark of upper Manhattan, and became still more famous as the site of the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965.
Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
Pedestrian Ramp, GW Bridge, N.Y.C., Nov. 1980

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 3 1/2" x 25" (id#105.1/362.22-26)
Panoramic landscapes of parks in New York.
Greenhouse, Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, October 1980

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 4 3/4" x 19" (id#105.2/356.44-5)
Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
Mausoleum, Trinity Church Cemetery, September 1980

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 4 3/4" x 12 1/2" (id#349.24-28)

It was an achievement to make a modern mausoleum fit in so well in the midst of a very old cemetery in a neighbourhood developed around 1900-1910.  Its masses are very well-proportioned and differentiated, thus avoiding a blockhouse effect.  The planners even managed to leave a strategic gap at just the right place to allow a fine neoclassical monument to be seen by passersby on Riverside Drive.
A panoramic landscape of a living room in upstate New York.
Living Room, LaGrangeville, N.Y., May 1980

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 5" x 23" (id#103.1b)

Making panoramic assemblages of interiors, one  gets more oblique angles, more overlapping, and a more disjointed effect when exposures are aimed down or up rather than horizontally.
Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
Ferris Booth Hall, Columbia University, NYC, ca. 1982

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 6" (id#497.17-22)
Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
Columbus Circle, New York City, n.d.

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 6" (id#648)
Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
Underpass, Bridge Supports, N.Y.C., n.d.

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 6" (id#IAD)
Panoramic landscapes of various places in New York City.
Hudson Street, West Village, N.Y.C., n.d.

120 format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 2 1/4" x 8 3/8" (id#IAD)
A panoramic interior of a bedroom in Long Island, with fresco painting of 1969-71 by my brother.
Bedroom with Psychedelic Frescoes, Islip, ca. 1982

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 9" (id#491)

My brother Brian spent a good part of the summers of 1969-73 painting the ceiling and walls of our bedroom with intense and colorful invented imagery.

On my Cartilium website there is a much bigger version of this image, in position #16 of the section "Urban and Interiors", that can be seen closely by scrolling (as in traditional Chinese and Japanese landscape painting on scrolls).
A panoramic interior of my old apartment in New York City.
Kitchen, Washington Heights, N.Y.C., ca. 1983

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 6" (id#564)
A panoramic interior of my family's old home in Long Island.
Living Room, Islip, Long Island, New York, ca. 1983

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 6" (id#574b)
A panoramic interior of my family's old home in Long Island.
Living Room and Kitchen, Long Island (Waltz), ca. 1983

35mm format, gelatin-silver prints, overall 1 1/2" x 14" (id#574a)

In this work, not only did I change vantage point considerably from frame to frame, but did a quick retrograde spin at about midpoint and moved into another room.

On my Cartilium website there is a much bigger version of this image, in the section "Urban and Interiors", that can be seen closely by scrolling.
Multi-framed photoassemblage of a cluttered artist's studio.
Photographer's Studio, 2008

Digital photographs, 8 x 46 cm. at 300dpi

A panoramic assemblage of the studio I've kept for years. Not my first panoramic subject with the theme of a fertile chaos.

On my Cartilium website there is an oversized version of this image can be seen by scrolling in the section "Urban and Interiors".  (At that size one can identify quite a few of the works represented elsewhere in this website.)
Brooklyn Bridge, Centenary Celebration
Brooklyn Bridge, Independence Day, 1986

35mm format, type C prints, overall 6 1/4" x 36 1/2" (id#109.1)

The occasion was a rooftop celebration of the centennial of the Statue of Liberty on July 4th, 1986.  The World Trade Center towers are visible at far left.

On my Cartilium website there is a much bigger version of this image in the section "Urban and Interiors" that can be seen closely by scrolling.

Multi-Frame Panoramic Assemblages - Urban Locations and Interiors


As with a previous group, the panoramic assemblages of parks, these are of mixed derivation.  Those with thin black borders (the first six in the sequence) are reproductions of photo assemblages actually made from small enlargements (about 3 1/2" x 5").  The very last, of the Brooklyn Bridge at night (in color), also with thin borders, was made of prints enlarged to 6" x 9" each and then mounted together.  The next to last was taken with a digital camera.  The remainder, with thick black borders, are of contact sheets, of which I made extra sets at the time with the intention of making these miniatures, which are in fact mounted and matted for display.  They make a very different kind of impact this way as opposed to enlarged.  I didn't mind that it was less work than making enlargements, but I don't exclude the possibility.  


Photography is a medium that tends to multiply:  the more primary work you do - the taking of photographs - the more secondary (and tertiary, etc.) work you create for yourself.  Therefore every photographer has to decide, given limited resources of time, materials, and storage space, which exposures to carry forward and produce for eventual display, and which to leave in the semi-oblivion of the photographer's personal archive.  Many worthy photographs, as good as the ones that make the cut, have to be left behind. 


A few of these - actually, the ones that suffer most from being crowded left and right in this page design - can be seen quite large on my older website, Cartilium, where you can scroll to the right to view the entire assemblage.  They are:


Living Room and Kitchen, Long Island (Waltz), ca. 1983

Bedroom with Psychedelic Frescoes, Islip, ca. 1982

Brooklyn Bridge, Independence Day, 1986

Photographer's Studio, 2008


© 2014 Allen Schill.  All rights reserved.  No part of this document may be reproduced or used without prior written permission from the author. Anyone is welcome to link to it, or to quote brief passages, but I would like to be notified.

© Copyright Allen Schill

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